High frequency of Candida fabianii among clinical isolates biochemically identified as Candida pelliculosa and Candida utilis

GeneProof a.s. in collaboration with the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc published the results of a study „High frequency of Candida fabianii among clinical isolates biochemically identified as Candida pelliculosa and Candida utilis" in PubMed. Co-author of the paper is Dita Bednářová.

See the article in the journal Mycoses 04/2016. 

 

High frequency of Candida fabianii among clinical isolates biochemically identified as Candida pelliculosa and Candida utilis

 

Svobodova L1, Bednarova D2, Ruzicka F3, Chrenkova V4, Dobias R5, Mallatova N6, Buchta V7, Kocmanova I8, Olisarova P9, Stromerova N10, Thongsri Y11, Hamal P1

 

Abstract


Clinical yeast isolates belonging to Candida pelliculosa, Candida utilis and Candida fabianii are difficult to distinguish in a routine mycology laboratory using common biochemical tests. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of C. pelliculosa, C. utilis and C. fabianii in clinical samples and to compare their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to systemic antifungals. Two hundred and forty-eight clinical yeast isolates obtained from eight large hospitals in the Czech Republic were included in this study. Identification was performed biochemically using ID 32C kit and by MALDI-TOF MS. MICs were determined using colorimetric broth dilution Sensititre YeastOne panels. From a total number of 248 isolates, 175 were identified as C. pelliculosa and 73 as C. utilis using the biochemical kit. In contrast, MALDI-TOF MS identified 222 isolates as C. fabianii, 20 as C. pelliculosa and 6 as C. utilis. The highest mean MICs were found in C. fabianii and, regardless of the studied species, in isolates from blood cultures and central venous catheters. MALDI-TOF MS revealed C. fabianii to be most prevalent in clinical samples as compared with the other studied species. Higher MIC values in C. fabianii support the importance of correct identification of this species.

 

1Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic.

2Research & Development Department, GeneProof a.s., Brno, Czech Republic.
3Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
4Department of Medical Microbiology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Motol University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.
5Laboratory of Clinical Mycology, Public Health Institute Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic.
6Laboratory of Parasitology and Mycology, Ceske Budejovice Hospital, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
7Department of Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital, Charles University, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic.
8Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospital Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
9Mycology Laboratory, Clinical Microbiology and ATB Centre, Institute of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics of the General University Hospital and of the First Faculty of Medicine of Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
10State Veterinary Institute Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
11Cellular and Molecular Immunology Research Unit (CMIRU), Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Science, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand.